Free IELTS resources to help you maximize your score.
Don’t stop at 7. Go and get that 9!

Dear Ryan,
Thanks to your guidance, I was able to increase my writing score from 6.5 to 7.5, and then to 8.5! I really don't believe I could have done it without you.
-Imam Mohamed

Hi Ryan,
I am so happy to inform you that I scored 7.5 in writing!
-Sunish Manalody

Hi Ryan,
Thanks for your help, I’ve scored band 8 in writing.
-Vladan Martinovic

Hi Ryan,
I prepared just by looking at your videos and scored 7.5! Thank you!
-Rahul Paldiwal

Hi Ryan,
I would like to thank you for your very helpful lessons. I finally got 7 in all modules and can now start residency processing for New Zealand!
-Kiran Kiccha

Hi Ryan,
I obtained a writing score of 8.5. Your videos were instrumental in helping me achieving this score. Thanks, mate!
-Carlos Flores

Hi Ryan,
Thank you for my 8.0 writing score. You ebook played a pivotal role in my success!
-Awais Butt

Hi Ryan,
I read your blog every day and scored 7.5 in writing!
-Vikrant Mahajan

I went from band 6.0 to 7.5 following Ryan’s coaching!
-Viacheslav Porotikov

How to start and end sentences in your IELTS Task 2 discussion essay (video)

Posted on March 31, 2011 by - 4 Comments

Here’s a quick video I threw together providing some tips on starting and ending sentences in your essay.

 

Effective examples versus ineffective examples on your Task 2 essay?

Posted on March 30, 2011 by - Comments are off

Let me offer an analogy regarding the importance of examples: Examples are to an IELTS essay as a tent pole is to a tent. In other words, examples are what hold up an argument in an essay (whether that argument is yours or someone else’s). Without them, an argument simply fails to hold much water and is impossible to prove. Thus to succeed on your IELTS Task 2 essay question, you’ve got to choose effective examples carefully.

So what makes a good example good and a bad example bad?
The answer is simple: (1) Good examples are specific. Bad examples are vague. (2) Good examples demonstrate the argument in action. Bad examples show little connection to the argument at all. (3) Good examples are displayed in a manner that does not disrupt the flow of the writer’s work. Bad examples feel like they have been randomly dropped into the essay.

When it comes to choosing an effective IELTS Task 2 essay example, specific is always the goal. Take the following, for example:

Don’t be ambiguous…
For instance, mobile phone growth in some countries has been dramatic.

Instead try being more specific…
For instance, mobile phone growth in China and India has been dramatic.

Don’t write in a manner that will make your IELTS examiner guess at your meaning…
Cars are the example.

Tell your examiner clearly what the link is between the argument you are trying to support and your evidence…
Cars play a good example here as they are the largest source of carbon emissions in the developing eastern world.

IELTS discussion essay writing process videos

Posted on March 30, 2011 by - Comments are off

Here is a 2-part video series I put together this morning regarding the discussion essay writing process. We also go over discussion essay question analysis.

Here are the IELTS textbooks I would recommend…

Posted on March 29, 2011 by - 2 Comments

There are thousands of IELTS books out there and most of them aren’t cheap. As an IELTS writing instructor, I have taught using many of these books and can conclude that some of them are overrated. An exam prep book, in my humble opinion, has to go beyond simply providing sample test questions and sample test answers. A good exam prep book needs to be able to describe effective thinking patterns, analytical reasoning and effective test taking strategies.

The following is a list of the textbooks I feel best outline the skills an IELTS test taker should know (click the images for more info):

1. How to prepare for IELTS (British Council, Ray de Witt) – This book provides an excellent summary of all section of the exam, plus helpful tips that clearly show what the student’s thought processes should be while engaging the IELTS test. Personally, I feel the sample questions in this book tend to be more challenging than those faced on the real exam, which makes this study guide a real mental workout for students of all levels.

2. Insight into IELTS (Cambridge Examinations Publishing) – I can hear you students out there groaning! Yes, this old series is definitely among the best IELTS prep books out there. What I like most is the open-ended lesson structures they provide that really show students how to think and how to train themselves to engage the examination with flexibility.  I’ve used parts of this book in my classroom for over five years.

3. Kaplan IELTS (Kaplan Publishing) – I feel the Kaplan textbook series (for all tests, not just IELTS) present the test-taking thought process in a gradual and easy to understand manner. I’ve used Kaplan’s IELTS series for both classroom IELTS courses as well as private 1-to-1 classes and students always appreciate the layout of the text, which is very straightforward (perfect for independent study).

eBooks eBooks

eBooks
Academic Task 1: How to write at a 9 level

This eBook groups all information the student needs to know to perform well on Task 1 of their Academic exam.

Buy Now
eBooks
General Task 1: How to write at a 9 level

Learn to write the 6 letter types that appear on the General exam.

Buy Now
eBooks
Academic and General Task 2: How to write at a 9 level

An eBook describing everything necessary to compose a successful essay.

Buy Now

Ryan's Recent Posts Posts

Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages in this IELTS essay? Watch and find out!

Here is the essay from the video:

Some people believe that it is better for children to begin learning a foreign language at primary school rather than secondary school. Do the advantages of this outweigh the disadvantages?

Foreign language studies are a typical component of curriculums the world over. However, the exact age at which students should first be introduced to a second language is often debated. Whether first taught at primary school or secondary school, advantages and disadvantages can be identified. This essay will analyse these items in an effort to prove one age group better than the other at which to begin foreign language studies.

Firstly, introducing a new language to primary school students has several advantages over delaying this introduction to secondary school. For one, as evidenced in numerous scientific studies, young minds are much more capable of acquiring accent, a truth that enables young people to reproduce language at a quality comparable to that of a native speaker. In addition to this, the heightened memories of young children make them much more capable of taking on the task of learning the massive amounts of vocabulary needed to be communicative in a second language. This of course accelerates their second language studies in ways not seen at the secondary school level. It is thus clear that teaching a second language at primary school has certain undeniable benefits.

Despite these advantages, there are potential drawbacks to introducing a foreign language at the primary school level. If the language component of the curriculum is not sensitive to local customs and traditions, it could interfere with a young learner’s understanding of their own culture, a challenge that is not apparent among the more mature secondary students. However, although this is a concern that should be taken seriously, educational bodies within a country have the power to review and vet content. This is a practice that curbs the possibility of cultural erosion. Further, delaying the introduction of foreign language studies also delays a student’s development as a worldly person that understands cultures outside their own. Thus, after analysis, the disadvantages to foreign language studies in primary school are not quite as discouraging as they may at first seem.

The above discussion makes clear that, despite select disadvantages, language learning is more effectively executed at primary school than secondary school. I thus hope governments the world over encourage the introduction of foreign language classes among their young learners.

Buy Ryan’s Task 2 ebook here: https://gumroad.com/l/fWPb

Have Ryan personally assess 5 of your Task 1 or 2 samples: http://tinyurl.com/zkr9w2r

First model essay of 2017! I make up all of the examples!

Some people feel raising the age limit required for obtaining a driver’s licence can enhance road safety. Would this be an effective strategy in your country?

The age at which a person is legally able to drive is a very important consideration. In my home country of Canada, successful test takers can drive independently at the age of 16, an age that I feel is too young. I thus agree that raising the driving age limit in my country would enhance road safety. To prove this, I will look at a driver’s maturity and the motivators behind their decision to drive.

Firstly, the experimental nature of the adolescent growth stage makes it a dangerous time at which to drive. Adolescent men, for example, are scientifically reported to have heightened levels of aggression, a trait that statistically diminishes by the time they are 20 years old. Thus, removing people prone to these more immature emotions can clearly have real ramifications on the overall safety of driving in Canada. Increasing the driving age should therefore be supported.

This position is further exemplified when looking at motivators behind a person’s decision to drive. For 16 year olds in Canada, these motivators tend to be social in nature, such as using a car to meet friends. Although many would argue this is a sign of healthy social development in a human being, it is a driving arrangement that sets up scenarios that can be very distracting for an inexperienced driver. In Canada, for example, traffic accidents are reportedly higher among 16 to 18 year olds travelling in cars with several passengers. Because motivators become less social as a person enters their twenties, these statistics suggest Canadian roads would be safer were the age limit of drivers raised and their motivations for driving evolved.

As the above shows, raising the age at which a person can drive would increase the safety of roads in my country. It is my hope that Canada does indeed take steps to put this new restriction on driving in place.

My Task 2 ebook has been updated for 2017!

I’m very proud to present to you the 2017 version of my Task 2 ebook!


The 5th version of my popular Task 2 ebook is finally ready for download! As always, it is completely free to those of you that have purchased an earlier version!

(Existing customers: email your receipt to ryan@ieltsielts.com to receive the free update!)

Don’t have a copy?

Buy it now and receive free updates for life!

CLICK HERE TO BUY IT NOW!
$15 USD

(The price is going up to $19 USD in 2017!)
Payment also possible using WeChat:

What’s in the updated version?
Here is what’s new in the 2017 version of Ryan’s ebook:

-89 pages of step-by-step IELTS advice! ✓✓

-All model responses have been read by an examiner and unofficially gauged Band 9! ✓✓

-There are new sections on applying argument and discussion essay structure to (1) advantage/disadvantage, (2) cause and effect, (3) problem and solution, and (4) double action Task 2 question types! ✓✓

-Learn how to concede points in your argument essay while remaining faithful to your thesis! ✓✓

-New discussion that will help you understand the IELTS Writing rubric and how the breadths influence each other! ✓✓

-A section outlining subtle language patterns in Task 2 questions that are often misread by candidates! ✓✓

-The perfect companion text to Ryan’s videos! ✓✓

Here is the table of contents:

table-of-contents

I’ve been updating this popular ebook for over five years! Buy it today and receive all future updates free of charge!

Academic and General Task 1 updates coming in January!

Read All Posts